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Page 1 Stereo Turntables (NO shipping)

Denon DP-1200

Denon DP-1200

Denon DP-1200 

 ('78-'81)  SOLD

In excellent cosmetic condition, this DP-1200 is (of course) fully operational.  

Known to some of those in the Denon fan base as the "flying saucer", the Denon DP-1200 (and similar Denon models) were considered part of the high performance record players of the vaulted hi-fi component series.   The "hi-rise" platter is one of Denon's famous designs that were emulated by others (Optonica, JVC, etc) but as to who really came up with the original idea is still a bit of a mystery.

This DP-1200 is a servo-controlled, direct-drive, semi-automatic (place the arm over the record, flip a switch and it gently descends to the groove of your choice while the platter starts up. At the end of play, the arm lifts up and the unit shuts off).  The luxurious dark walnut finish gives it that "top-shelf" appeal.

On start-up, the platter hits perfect speed in a little over one second and the pitch controls (should you ever need to use them) are situated on the rim of the platter.  Except for the start switch, all the controls are on the platter as well.  A window in the center of the platter houses the strobe for observing chosen speed (33/45 RPM) 

The S-shaped tonearm comes with the original dark "champagne" Denon
headshell.  Included and mounted is a high quality Pickering XV-15-625E cartridge and new XV 15/1200 E | BD stylus.

The DP-1200 is larger than your "typical" turntable and weighs about 25 lbs.  The original, lightly tinted dust cover is in excellent condition as well.  Under the original factory feet are four custom anti-resonant foam pads with bronze coating.

Specs:
Drive System: Direct Drive By AC Servo Motor
Speed Control: Frequency Detection Servo System
Speed Range: +-3%
Wow And Flutter: Less Than 0.018% Wrms
Signal To Noise Ratio: Over 75dB
Starting Time: Less Than 1.5 Seconds
Tonearm: Static Balance Type, Auto Arm Lift
Cartridge Weight Range: 5 To 11g
Stylus Force Range: 0 To 2.5g
Cueing: Oil Damped System
Dimensions: 19"W X 7.5"H X 15.6"D
Weight: 25 Lbs


About Denon...
The Denon brand was first established in 1947 when Nippon Columbia merged with Japan Denki Onkyo.  They further went on in May 2002 when Denon Ltd and Marantz of Japan Inc. merged to become one company.

Many of Denon's audio creations have become highly sought after by true audiophiles as Denon never skimped on quality, they chose to make the best gear with the best parts available at the time.


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Sony PS-3300

Sony PS-3300

Sony PS-3300 

('76-'78)  $400

In excellent cosmetic condition, fully serviced and fully operational,  this well built and attractive Sony PS-3300 is a semi-automatic turntable.   Features include a gorgeous design, high quality specs, strobe and speed controls (trim pots.
This fine vintage turntable also comes with the original box and packing materials.

A major feature has to be the included Micro Acoustics MA-2002/e cartridge and stylus mounted on the original Sony headshell.  The MA-2002/e is defined as an "electret transducer" design.  As such, it's a true audiophile quality cartridge that tracks at 1.5 grams with excellent clarity and detail.  For future reference, the correct replacement stylus is available online. Here is a link to the full description of the cartridge:
https://www.lpgear.com/product/MA2002E.html

Designed to compete directly with Pioneer's PL-510, Sony challenged Pioneer with their PS-3300 at the same price point in 1976; you could buy the Pioneer's direct-drive manual unit or Sony's direct-drive semi-automatic unit.  Essentially, Sony offered an auto-return arm and reject button at the same price with nearly identical specs and build quality.  

The PS-3300 was an export-only model that was a mix between the Sony PS-2800's base structure and PS-3700's pitch controls and strobe. 
Features include DC-Servo BSL motor, X-Tal Lock + Magnedisc and SBMC base.  It also has a finely crafted direct-drive system with that brushless and slotless DC servo-controlled motor.  Sony added a fine innovation with their speed monitoring system which was an electronic process using an 8-pole magnetic pick-up head and a pulse coated platter rim.  Plus, as previously mentioned above, there's independent fine speed adjustments and a sensitive tonearm.

Sony's unique "lunar" platter mat was another idea that first appeared on the PS-3300. In essence, the design called for little air-filled pads to dampen the record's vibration and, apparently, it works.  It didn't hurt that the mat, just by itself, is very cool indeed.

This beautiful turntable comes with the original clear acrylic dust cover and the original factory spring-loaded feet.   

Weighing in at about 18 lbs, it's heavy enough to remind you that the PS-3300 is one of Sony's high quality turntables with great looks and reliable operation.

Essential specs:
Drive method: direct drive....
Motor: dc servo-controlled motor (brushless)....
Speeds: 33 and 45rpm....Wow and flutter 0.04% wrms
Signal to noise ratio: 65dB....
Cartridge weight range: 4 to 10g....
Dimensions: 18"W x 6.5"H x 14"D....
Weight: 18 lbs

Sony PS-X75

Sony PS-X75

Sony PS-X75  

('79-'82)  SOLD

Obtained from the estate of the original owner, this Sony PS-X75 "Biotracer" turntable had been sitting idle for a few years.  As such, it needed an extended trip to the *bench.  It has been fully restored, serviced and tested.  This beauty is now in excellent cosmetic condition as well. 
As a bonus, the headshell on the Biotracer tonearm comes mounted with a NIB Sumiko Andante-S MM cartridge & stylus. 

NOTE:
 Designed in 1982, this Sumiko Andante-S cartridge and stylus has never been used before.  The original box still contains the original documentation, sealed bag of tools, screws and original case. The cartridge was removed from the box and mounted on the PS-X75 simply because a turntable of this quality deserves a cartridge at the same high level of quality.  Essentially, t
he Andantes series of cartridges were rebadged Grace F9s.  They were (are) a seriously high quality lineup sold by Sumiko in the early 80's. 

*Bench service:
Besides the routine turntable service and due to the complexity of the design itself, we paid special attention towards the removal of all dried grease/lube/oil/dirt in all of the the automatic contact points and related mechanisms.  We then painstakingly applied fresh lube into all those critical areas, paying special attention to the entire cueing assembly. 
Additionally, the light sensor board containing the lamp was accessed so we could replace and upgrade it with a long-life, cool running white LED.
NOTE: The cueing function on these Biotracer units is a known issue when not properly cleaned and lubed.  It can affect the entire automatic function when the cueing assembly decides to quit working. 

Befitting its reputation as one of Sony's "holy grail" turntables, the exterior cosmetic design of the PS-X75 is truly elegant.  The raised platter has a perfectly clean chrome finish and a unique platter mat that "locks" in place with two raised bumpers underneath it.  The ebony metallic plinth has a satin-shiny effect that blends well with the combination of the brushed aluminum tonearm assembly and the front control bar.  All the controls are accessible with the cover closed.  At the base is slim wrap-around rosewood laminate.  The entire turntable is supported on four softly sprung, fully adjustable rubber feet with additional 1/2" thick foam pads. The isolation they provided against vibration conducted through the supporting surface is outstanding, 

The Sony PS-X75 is a 2-speed, direct-drive turntable with Biotracer electronically controlled tonearm.  It represented the third generation from their golden age of turntable design.  The PS-X5/6/7 series began the peak, it then continued with the X50/60/70 series, and then the great X65/75 tables.  They continued to refine this design well into the early '80s, when CD's arrived and sent all the engineers scurrying away to master the new format.  It features Sony's unique tonearm, dubbed the "Biotracer."  It began on an earlier model and was pretty much perfected here.  The Biotracer uses magnets and electronic parts for its automated movements, promising shiny touch controls.  Just press a button and Biotracer takes care of everything - you never have to lay a finger on the tonearm.

The Biotracer design also tackles tonearm resonance, one of the oldest engineering challenges in turntables.  Most tonearms must be matched properly with the tonearm, so resonances do not interfere with the musical signal.  Sony's design essentially eliminates this problem.  In theory, you should be able to play any kind of phono cartridge on the Biotracer, regardless of its mass or compliance.

As the stylus force is electronically controlled by a knob on the front panel, it can be easily adjusted during record play.  Record size is set by a photo sensor system; if no record is on the turntable, the tonearm will not descend but will return to the arm rest.  It maintains an accurate and drift-free speed by referring to a frequency generated by a very stable crystal oscillator, and with the aid of a speed monitoring system which utilises a magnetic pick-up head and a pulse signal derived from a magnetic coating at the edge of the platter.  An electronic brake system stops the turntable quickly and smoothly.

Essential specs:
Speed accuracy: 0.015%
150g load speed drift: 0%
Wow & flutter: 78dB
Full speed ahead: 1/2 rotation
Dimensions: 19"W x 7"H x 16.5"D
Weight: 29 lbs

As 
The Vintage Knob website so eloquently stated:
"One of the penultimate Sony turntables to be produced, the PS-X75 was launched at the october 1979 Tokyo Audio Fair : it was to be a revised version of the PS-B80 : the latter was outer space sci-fi in 1978, the former was everyday sci-fi in 1979.
If its principles remained untouched, the J-shaped Biotracer tonearm was entirely re-engineered, especially the magnet / coil / bobbin arrangements of the vertical velocity and vertical linear motors - both those inside the top housing and those which deal with horizontal movements and make the bottom of the Biotracer.
It worked : most of the still visible PS-X75 have far less "blank moments", if any, than any of the PS-B80.
The features remained the same (all-automated everything, deported stylus force ring) but the stylus cleaner and digital readout of the stylus force vanished. The latter display would come back in the slightly re-looked but otherwise identical PS-X700.
The proprietary mat sports on its back side a protractor (thank you Sony), the BSL motor is the same and so are the barium-ferrite imprint read by an 8-pole magnetic head and linked X'Tal speed locking system.
Otherwise... what to say ?
The PS-X75 works beautifully, sonically as well, and it works beautifully and sonically as well. As a result, it sold very well worldwide.
The PS-X75 and PS-X700 cohabited a while in the (Japanese) catalogs until the ultimate step was launched : the excellent PS-X800 tangential Biotracer (1981) and the PS-X555ES version of the latter (1983).
There was nothing after that but Digital and Compact Disc - end of an era."


Biotracer tech history (kudos to Audio circle website)...
In the late '70s early '80s just before CD was introduced, several Japanese manufactures introduced turntables using active electronic servo damping of the tonearm. Sony called their version ‘Biotracer’ in models like PS-X75, PS-B80 et.al. Later they used the same technology in linear tracking models like the PS-X800. Denon was another proponent of this technology with the DP-47F, DP-62L enjoying a cult following due to their ‘Dynamic Servo Tracer’ servo tonearms, (https://www.tonepublications.com/old-school/denon-dp-62l-direct-drive-turntable/).  Pioneer may have also dabbled in servo arm technology.

The trick of these turntable + tonearm models is where 99.999% of all tonearms ever made have simple bearings allowing the tonearm to track the record in ‘Biotracer’ and ‘Dynamic Servo Tracer’ servo tonearms a set of electrical servo coils, motion sensors, and feedback circuits are added around the vertical and horizontal bearings of the tonearm. This allows the application of electrical damping into the system.

It’s rather counter-intuitive unless one has studied the complicated nature of servo feedback loops.  However, we will try and explain...

...try to recall that, in normal tonearm + cartridge systems (like the VPI firewall) is slamming the effective mass of the tonearm acting with the compliance of the cartridge causes a primary resonance in the system. To keep it outside the nominal audio range the usual target is to have the system resonate at 11-12 Hz. The servo trick is that a good engineer can tune the electrical servo coils, motion sensors, and feedback circuits to completely damp out the 11 – 12 Hz resonance. When the mechanical resonance tries to push up the sensor detects that and the feedback loop powers the coil to push down. That over simplifies it, of course it's acting in all x,y,z, directions on a band width set to achieve the desired result. Besides the feedback loop disappearing the LF resonance the added servo coils and circuits allow fun party tricks like setting the vertical tracking force, anti-skating, and system damping while a record is playing.

Like spring flowers in the desert, ‘Biotracer’ and ‘Dynamic Servo Tracer’ servo tonearms flowered during a 5-6 year run then disappeared awaiting rediscovery. Given this was just before and during the introduction of CD. The big downside of ‘Biotracer’ and ‘Dynamic Servo Tracer’ servo tonearms is the added complexity that limited them to the $500 - $1000+ range in these turntables during the early 80's
 (that's equivalent to $1500 - $3250 in 2024). This was a segment of the market that essentially disappeared for years after the introduction of CD.


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Technics SL-5200

Technics SL-5200

Technics SL-5200 

(1978)   $350 (with extras)

In perfect cosmetic and operating condition, this highly upgraded Technics SL-5200 is a direct-drive, semi-automatic turntable that had a few similarities to it's cousin, the SL-1200MKii but at a much lower cost.
The Technics SL-5200 is a mid-fi, 2-speed turntable first released in 1978.

The plinth has a unique customized textured coating covering the entire hefty resin-compound body with the original non-adjustable spring-loaded feet.  The feet are sitting on four custom, color-matched 1/2" thick anti-resonant foam pads. It also has a thick aluminum platter and non-height adjustable “S” shaped tonearm with the original black anodized aluminum headshell.  Mounted on the headshell is an excellent Audio Technica I-LT cartridge with (NOS) ATN-102P stylus

Even though the SL-5200 was released one year before the legendary SL-1200MK2, it has a very similar updated (for the time) tonearm bearing setup like the 1200MK2.  The difference being the arm bearing is fixed in place, with no height or azimuth adjustments. Also, like many full-size Technics turntables from the late 70s, the SL-5200 has a coreless no-wear direct-drive motor, that while not identical to the SL-1200MK2’s, is very reminiscent of it. It also originally came with the same cartridge alignment tool that was bundled with the 1200, and countless other Technics “S” shape tonearm turntables.

The word “THICK” helps describe this turntable a lot. Everything from the robustness of the plastic to the weight of the tonearm just feels hefty and substantialThe 5200 has a relatively high placed thick aluminum platter and is fully-equipped with a levitating, color-matched 45rpm adapter that sits on its own rest.  It also has a .25" headshell holder for cart swapping, a prism stylus illuminator (aka "target lamp") and a strobe light.  There is a small button that allows you to shut off the target lamp if so desired.All the controls are also pushed to the front panel and are accessible when the dust cover is closed, which makes it also a deep turntable.

The solid build of the SL-5200 is due to what they called "Technics Non-Resonant Compound" (or TNRC.) According to marketing materials, it was developed to help reduce overall vibration and resonance throughout the body of the turntable.


Basic specs:
Type: semi-automatic turntable
Drive method: direct drive
Motor: brushless DC motor
Speeds: 33 and 45rpm
Pitch control: +-6%
Dimensions: 17"W x 6"H x 15"D
Weight: 16 lbs


About TECHNICS / MATSUSHITA / PANASONIC...
Founded in the 1920's, the huge Japanese conglomerate Matsushita had interests in many electronics companies.  The most well known would be Technics and Panasonic. Technics was introduced as a brand name for premium loudspeakers marketed domestically by Matsushita in 1965.  Eventually, Technics became a premium brand bringing classics like the SL-1200mkii turntable and the absolute monster receiver at the top of the list: Technics SA-1000 (330 watts per channel)

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Pioneer PL-51

Pioneer PL-51

Pioneer PL-51 

(1972)  $450 (pristine)

In excellent cosmetic and working condition, this one-owner Pioneer PL-51 is another masterpiece from the leader of Japanese electronics in the 70's.   It comes with the original (very nice) Pioneer over-sized 45 adapter with white silk screen lettering and the original owner's manual.

Similar, yet different from the PL-71, the differences being no strobe lamp, walnut vinyl veneer and a completely different control panel on the PL-51.  On the control panel, a single  lever switches on the motor / platter and handles the cueing as well.
NOTE: Pioneer introduced the PL-51A in 1974 that added a slightly upgraded motor and strobe lamp but was, for all practical purposes, basically the same as the original PL-51.

The cosmetic design and superior build quality in this series of tables has them firmly entrenched in the "upper class" of legendary direct-drive manual units from Pioneer.  The PL-51 is from the series just before the PL-530 introduction. It was the second to the top-of-the-line PL-71 with its adjustable VTA (tonearm base height), a feature found only on the top models.  Upon its introduction, it listed for $250 in 1972.

This all-electronic, direct-drive turntable has a brushless DC servo motor and super-sensitive S-shaped tonearm.   The arm comes with the original headshell and an excellent (essentially like new) Grado Black FX3 cartridge & stylus.  The platter comes with the original factory mat.

The PL-51 is a super quiet table that's virtually vibration-tree. The brushless DC servo motor directly rotates the platter without belts or rim idlers which means that vibration-causing factors are eliminated.

The sophisticated direct-drive system and all-electronic DC servo control reduce wow and flutter to less than 0.06% (WRMS) and boosts signal-to-noise ratio to better than 60dB -figures which place the PL-51 in the same desirable top-shelf category as the PL-71 

The surface is covered with a beautiful and perfect walnut vinyl veneer.  Plus, one of the features we really like...the output jacks allow you to use your own high quality cables!

Other features include:
~S-shaped tonearm that was specially developed by Pioneer to perform at light tracking pressures (0.59 and up) 
~speed controls topside (with separate trim pots inside the unit)
~Lateral balancer with anti-skate control 
~Gentle oil damped cueing
~Lightly tinted and  oversized dust cover with strong adjustable metal hinges and real leather lift-grips to avoid messy fingerprints

The veneer covers the double construction cabinet to provide ideal mass for stability and resistance to external vibration.  The original spring-loaded feet have additional custom foam pads to help eliminate resonance. 

Specs:
Type: Direct Drive
Motor: Brushless DC Servo Controlled Motor
Speeds: 33 And 45rpm
Speed Control Range: Within +-2%
Wow And Flutter: 0.05%
Rumble: More Than 60dB
Platter: 310mm Aluminium Alloy Diecast
Tonearm: Static-Balance Type, S-Shaped Pipe Arm
Cartridge Weight Range: 4 To 32g
Dimensions: 18.8"W X 7.3"H X 16.4"D
Weight: 25 Lbs

Pioneer PL-71

Pioneer PL-71

Pioneer PL-71 

 ('73-'76)  $500 (pristine)

In excellent cosmetic and working condition, this Pioneer PL-71 is another masterpiece from the leader of Japanese electronics in the 70's.  Its visual design and tightly controlled build quality has it firmly entrenched in the "upper class" of legendary direct-drive manual units from Pioneer.  

The PL-71 is from the series just before the PL-530 introduction. It was the top-of-the-line model with adjustable VTA (tonearm base height), a feature found only on the top models.  Upon its introduction, it listed for $300 in 1974.

This all-electronic, direct-drive turntable has a brushless DC servo motor and super-sensitive S-shaped tonearm.   The arm comes with a beautiful custom real timberwood headshell with an excellent and pristine Acutex M4110E cartridge and bi-radial stylus.  The platter comes with your choice of either the "Corkey" (cork n' rubber) mat or the original factory mat.

The PL-71 is a dead quiet table that's virtually vibration-tree. The brushless DC servo motor directly rotates the platter without belts or rim idlers which means that vibration-causing factors are eliminated.

The sophisticated direct-drive system and all-electronic DC servo control reduce wow and flutter to less than 0.05% (WRMS) and boosts signal-to-noise ratio to better than 60dB -figures which place the PL-71 in the category of a "must have" for any serious collector.

The elegant controls are laid out in a cohesive manner;  simply push the 33 (or 45 button) and the platter starts.  Push the Power Off button and the platter stops.  The surface is primarily wood, lots of beautiful wood.  One of the features we really like...the output jacks are available, you can use your own high quality cables!

Other features include:
~Built-in strobe
~S-shaped tonearm that was specially developed by Pioneer to perform at light tracking pressures (0.59 and up) 
~speed controls topside (with separate trim pots inside the unit)
~Lateral balancer with anti-skate combined with a direct-readout stylus pressure scale. 
~Gentle oil damped cueing
~Lightly tinted and  oversized dust cover with strong adjustable metal hinges.

The thick real walnut veneer covers the double construction cabinet to provide ideal mass for stability and resistance to external vibration.  The original feet have additional custom foam pads to help eliminate resonance. 

Specs:
Type: Direct Drive
Motor: Brushless DC Servo Controlled Motor
Speeds: 33 And 45rpm
Speed Control Range: Within +-2%
Wow And Flutter: 0.05%
Rumble: More Than 60dB
Platter: 310mm Aluminium Alloy Diecast
Tonearm: Static-Balance Type, S-Shaped Pipe Arm
Cartridge Weight Range: 4 To 32g
Dimensions: 18.8"W X 7.3"H X 16.4"D
Weight: 25 Lbs


About Pioneer...
Not much needs to be said about Pioneer other then the simple fact that the name is known worldwide for above average quality and excellence in high fidelity component design.  They were the unchallenged leader in stereo advertising and marketing in the 70's.  Back in the day, Pioneer made it clear that if you didn't have a Pioneer stereo system in your house (or college dorm) you just didn't have the right stuff.


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Hitachi HT-40S

(1980)  $225

In excellent cosmetic and working condition, this Hitachi HT-40S is a direct-drive, 2-speed, "auto-manual" turntable.  Similar to Pioneer's "auto-manual" turntables, it just means you never have to manually place or lift the arm to play a record.  Simply use the onboard controls to set the arm down on the record and press "cut" at the end of play.

One of the main features of the 40-S would be the very reliable "UniTorque" brushless DC motor attached directly to the platter itself.   Although not one of Hitachi's top models, the 40-S is a solid, well designed entry level turntable and relatively affordable.  

The straight pipe tonearm is highly sensitive with top notch gimbal support. As an added bonus, the P-mount headshell comes with a new Audio Technica cartridge & stylus.

The original spring loaded feet have additional foam pads to help guard against unwanted resonance.  The original dustcover has solid metal spring hinges that will never break.


Basic specs:

Type: auto manual
Drive method: direct drive
Motor: brushless DC servo
Speeds: 33 and 45rpm
Speed change system: electronic change over
Cartridge weight range: 4 to 10g
Dimensions: 17"W x 14.4"D x 5"H
Weight: 13 lbs


About Hitachi...
Unknown to many people, Hitachi (like Sanyo and Toshiba) were major Japanese tech firms that either directly built systems for other electronic companies or had Hitachi high end parts (like output transistors) inside the competitors products.   Class G is just one example of Hitachi's leadership in vintage audio technology. 
Power MOS FET amplifiers, R&P 3-head system cassette decks, Uni-torque turntable motors and gathered-edge metal cone speakers are just some of the others. There's a lot more.  Hitachi of Japan was one of the companies that made their own filter caps, transformers, etc...in-house.  They also supplied many other famous names with Hitachi-made components (like Pioneer, Sony, even Marantz used Hitachi parts.)


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