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Stereo Turntables

Sony PS-1100
Sony PS-1100

Sony PS-1100

(1976) $200

We've been fortunate to have had several of the Sony *Gold Badge" turntables over the years and the PS-1100 is another beautiful example.

They are very cool looking, very reliable​ and operates perfectly with its rim-drive. (There were several rim drive turntables available from many companies, some dating back to the 50's. It was an effective way to keep rumble and inertia under control and, in most cases, actually better than some belt drive units.)

It's a semi-automatic with cueing, reject and on/off lever. Included is the chrome anti-skate "dongle" which is usually missing. The walnut veneer case is flawless. A new custom dust cover adds a touch of class.

*Note:The Gold Badge edition of Sony turntables was a marketing twist to help separate Sony from the competition. It's literally a "gold" nameplate on the front and supposedly was meant to show that any of these units were "a cut above" the others.


About Sony...

Nothing to add here because Sony is one of the most famous global brands to ever come from Japan.


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Rotel RP-1000
Rotel RP-1000

Rotel RP-1000 

(1973) $220

The classic Rotel RP-1000 turntable is an early 70's beauty and getting hard to find, especially in such beautiful condition as this one is.  

The gorgeous tigerwood plinth is an immediate eye catcher.  

The RP-1000 is a belt drive with a fully sprung floating suspension and is a semi-automatic (auto-return)

The steady 4-pole synchronous motor is super accurate, one of the best of the belt-driven units from Rotel.  A statically balanced S-shaped tonearm makes for perfect lateral placement and accurate tracking.  Also included is a brand new Ortofon cartridge and stylus.

There are two empty slots to accommodate extra headshells for those that like to switch their choice of a different cartridge/stylus depending on how you like to tailor your experience.

As with all our gear, everything is working just as it should. 

The tonearm bearings are nice and tight...the tinted dust cover is also near mint condition. Also included a copy of the owner's manual. 

About Rotel... 

Rotel is a family-owned Japanese manufacturer of high end audio and video equipment. The company was established in 1961. In the early 1980s Rotel joined the B&W Group forming a strategic alliance with Bowers and Wilkins and later adding Classé Audio.

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Polished turntable feet and clamps...
Polished turntable feet and clamps...

Turntable accessories

Polished Adjustable Feet  (set of 4)  $130/set

for Pioneer PL-530, PL-117, Yamaha, Marantz & other turntables

These are brand new polished aluminum adjustable feet to replace broken or missing turntable feet. They are machined out of 6061 aluminium, made in NC USA. These custom turntable feet are precisely machined to fit in place of many different vintage turntable with minor modifications.  They easily replace those that have disintegrated over time. They feature pliable rubber attached to the bottoms that absorb vibration. The height can be adjusted up to .580 inches. The outside diameter is 2.0 and the height is 2.0-2.58   Designed to Pioneer PL-530, PL-115, PL-117, Yamaha YP-B2, Marantz 6150 and many others.



Aluminum record clamp (turntable record weight) $55 (each)


These brand new turntable weights are machined out of 6061 aluminum in North Carolina USA.  Designed to help smooth out slightly warped records (and help with distortion which will result in a deeper more prominent bass presence.) They are also aesthetically pleasing to the eyes!  They weigh in at 13.2oz or 375 grams, measure 3.45in or 87.63mm in diameter at the base and are 1.35" or 34.29 mm tall. 
They will fit under most turntable dust covers however there may be some exceptions.



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Technics SL-3300
Technics SL-3300

Technics SL-3300

(1978) $300 (Shipping not available on this unit)

In 1978, Technics released their highly respected 3000 series turntables and they were all direct-drive.  

There were 3 models: the SL-3200 semi-auto, SL-3300 full-auto and the SL-3350 stacker.

This SL-3300 fully automatic turntable is in excellent cosmetic and working condition. It features the excellent Technics' frequency-generator, servo-controlled, direct-drive motor...highly regarded due to its very slight trace of wow/flutter and equally low rumble. It's also immune to to load or line fluctuations.

Fully serviced and performing flawlessly, this 3300 features a highly accurate, gimbal-suspended, S-shaped tonearm that allows use of even the highest compliance cartridge you could want. The tonearm friction is a mere 7 mg on both the horizontal and vertical planes.

Already mounted and included is a very nice Shure RM910ED cartridge (basically same as the M91ED) and a low hours use Shure Hi-track stylus (second only to the TOTL Shure V15).

The front panel controls on the 3300 are laid out to make it simple to operate everything with the dust cover closed. Also, the original dust cover is in like new condition.

Other features include topside strobe with independent pitch controls and Technics' "Memo-Repeat" function (this means you can select single play or up to six times continuous repeat of the record.) 

Certainly one of the better Technics turntables from the late 70's, the SL-3300 is a fine piece of vintage history.

Technics SL-D1
Technics SL-D1

Technics SL-D1 

(1978)  SOLD


Note: price does not include record clamp or second headshell, for display only)

Technics was a major player in the turntable market for many many years. 

This absolutely pristine condition Technics SL-D1 was one of their offerings from about 1977-1978.  Although considered the most affordable of Technics' direct-drive decks, it doesn't skimp on quality.  The SL-D1 reflects many of the developments which made Technics a leader in the turntable industry. 

The SL-D1 is a servo -controlled, direct-drive, manually operated  turntable.  

Direct-drive, manual turntables are generally considered the "best" because most of the build technology was concentrated on the motor and drive system.  So, without the added auto-return or full auto mechanisms, basically, these are the most reliable type of turntable among them all.

Although considered the most affordable of Technics' direct-drive decks, it doesn't skimp on quality.  The SL-D1 reflects many of the developments which made Technics a leader in the turntable industry. 

To begin with, it's speed accuracy is excellent with high torque and near instantaneous start-up. It also has speed pitch control for both 33/45, adjustable within a range of +-6%.

The static-balanced S-shaped tonearm includes a Shure M91-ED cartridge with new stylus.  

The dust cover is also pristine.

The direct-drive motor has a lightning fast circuit that automatically senses the precise speed for accurate rotation even under sudden loads.  The unique double-isolated suspension system; one damps out vibration from the base, the other from the platter and tonearm.  

Other features include gentle oil-damped cueing and built-in strobe.

At about 19 lbs, this is one of Technics most popular entry level and heavier turntables!


About TECHNICS / MATSUSHITA / PANASONIC

Founded in the 1920's, the huge Japanese conglomerate Matsushita had interests in many electronics companies.  The most well known would be Technics and Panasonic. Technics was introduced as a brand name for premium loudspeakers marketed domestically by Matsushita in 1965.  Eventually, Technics became a premium brand bringing classics like the SL-1200mkii turntable and the absolute monster receiver at the top of the list: Technics SA-1000 (330 watts per channel)


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JVC L-F210
JVC L-F210

JVC L-F210 

 ('83-'85)  $185

In absolutely excellent cosmetic and working condition, this early 80's JVC turntable was built with solid features for solid performance.  It features a coreless direct-drive motor, JVC's proprietary "Independent Suspension" system, a low-mass, straight pipe tonearm and even a pitch control.
Its operating ease is the first thing they thought of...no question about it, because the L-F210 is fully automatic, from auto lead-in to end of record lead out and motor shut off.

The JVC automatic mechanism of the L-F210 is foolproof. And it is far more accurate and gentle than your fingers ever could be. There's never a reason to touch the tonearm at any time. The stylus is protected from damage and records last longer.

Operating controls are along the front edge and within easy reach even when the dust cover is closed.

JVC used a low-wow coreless DC direct-drive motor in the L-F210 for the sake of speed accuracy. Built entirely by JVC in their own plant, the flawless motor exhibits very low wow and flutter resulting in music that's reproduced pitch perfect.

Tonearm resonance, when excited by warps or eccentricities, even slightly, adds coloration to music, giving a fuzzy edge to it. The low-mass straight pipe tonearm is desensitized to resonance (the reason why when records are played on the L-F210 you hear so much detail and clarity, especially with the very nice included AT DR350 cartridge/stylus).  And since it is straight, the tonearm is highly resistant to torsion and so sensitivity remains high even after long use.

The L-F210 has a pitch control that lets you adjust speed up to 3 percent faster or slower than standard. It's a must have feature if you're a musician, amateur or otherwise, for it lets you precisely match the pitch of a record to any musical instrument. Of course, you can quickly return to the right pitch whenever you want thanks to a built-in strobe with neon light.


About JVC...
JVC was established in Yokohama, Japan in 1927 as the Japanese subsidiary of the U.S. firm, Victor Talking Machine Company. They pressed the very first record ever...in Japan in 1930.  One of the more interesting facts about JVC was that they built all their products in-house.  Many other famous Japanese electronic companies farmed out a lot of design and manufacturing to subcontractors.  That alone doesn't mean anything is necessarily wrong with having others build your gear but to have control of the entire process in house was quite unusual.  Plus it saved a lot of money...allowing JVC to provide high quality gear at a lower price than some of the competition.
 There unusual approach to design (for vintage stereo gear) included the extensive use of multi-band graphic equalizers instead of simple bass/mid/treble controls.  The quality of their vintage turntables and electronic gear is mostly first rate and has emerged from being "under the radar" of collectors looking for excellent value.
JVC was a great manufacturer of audio gear. The brand was sadly damaged during the recession of the late 80s and never really recovered from it. Originally, the Japan Victor Company was once associated with the RCA Victor Company. They built a name providing competing audio equipment at a lower price point than the more established names. However, their middle and upper range units were very good to exceptional...JVC and Denon turntables. Looking at the higher end turntables of the two manufacturers, there could be some merit, but who helped who is the big question.

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Reference 610-T
Reference 610-T

Reference 610T 

(1980) $250

The high quality Reference 610-T turntables, when in great condition like this one, are somewhat rare and have an elegant design.  

All of the Reference series units were sold by Pacific Stereo.  They were responsible for the great success of the Concept and Reference models, developed in the USA and built in Japan.
This 610T is a DC direct drive, semi-automatic, very heavy, premium deck with a massive die-cast platter, ultra low-mass S-shape, satin black tonearm and satin black headshell mounted with a brand new Ortofon cartridge and stylus.

The beautiful black satin finished plinth is complimented with real walnut side panels.  

This also has a new custom acrylic dust cover. 

Like all the Reference series components, this is a very nice, very solid, very good looking vintage deck.

About CONCEPT AND REFERENCE... 

We had the good fortune to have worked at Pacific Stereo in the late 60's (back when they only had three stores!) Today, it's not commonly known but, at one time, (late 70's) all the house brands like Concept, Reference, Quadraflex, etc (and almost all other well-known brands of the time) were sold by Pacific Stereo.  As one of the largest stereo chain stores in the USA (especially in the West) they eventually faded away but not before they left behind a legacy of some very fine equipment they designed in-house but were made in Japan.  The Concept units were first tier (top of the lineup) followed closely behind in quality by the Reference series. The Concept 16.5 stereo receiver (165 watts per channel) is considered by many to be one of the best of the "Holy Grail" of vintage receivers.

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MCS Panasonic/Technics 2500
MCS Panasonic/Technics 2500

MCS (Technics) 2500 

(1978)  $220


This cool black beauty MCS 2500 is essentially a "hybrid" that's situated somewhere between the Technics SL-20 and SL-23 models.  Same motor and belt size as the SL-20/23 but branded "MCS".  Interestingly, this early MCS 2500 was called Matched Component Systems rather then the later Modular Component Systems.  Strictly a marketing decision.  MCS is MCS.

The 2500 is a semi-automatic deck for convenient tonearm return and shut-off exactly like the SL-23.  

Also, it is in a nice black color scheme and looks more classy than the usual silver this era of Technics sports. And, like the early Technics, this series of MCS turntables came with the S-type tonearm and universal SME cartridge head shell which allows much more in the way of cartridge choices and upgrading, unlike the later Technics P-mount straight tonearms.

Also included is a brand new Ortofon cartridge and stylus, already mounted on the tonearm.


Another difference between the Technics versions and the MCS 2500 is the black vinyl laminated MDF plinth on the 2500 is far better than the plastic variants used on the Technics models...much better damping and less acoustic rumble.and comes with the beautiful original, crystal clear dust cover.


About MCS (Modular Component Systems)...
MCS was the house brand for JC Penney back in the 70's and was often passed over by audiophiles simply because it was sold by Penney's.  However, in our opinion, whoever worked for JC Penney's electronics acquisition department at the time certainly had discerning taste which resulted in some very good products being offered. There is some debate over who actually manufactured the MCS series for JC Penney. Most seem to agree that it was either NEC while others mention Technics. 
Probably the different models in the MCS line were made by different manufacturers, all of whom designed great products for Penney's.  By the late 70's, it was near the end of the receiver power wars and despite the fact that most of the mid to high range MCS units had actually incorporated some of the latest technology at the time, digital was looming on the horizon and was about to change the face of HiFi.


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Realistic Lab 290 with custom cabinet
Realistic Lab 290 with custom cabinet

Realistic Lab 290 (custom cabinet)

(1980)  $265


This Realistic Lab 290 has been retrofit into a very cool 70's vintage walnut turntable cabinet with heavy duty spring hinges and thick perplex dust cover.

The Lab 290 is another of the many excellent turntables made in Japan for Radio Shack by CEC, it personifies the vintage look and it's a gorgeous piece.

Like the other late 70's turntables from Radio Shack, the Lab 290 is also lesser known as its more popular Lab cousins (like the Lab 400 & 440), but the Lab 290 is a rock-solid, two-speed, belt-drive, semi-automatic deck with a faithful DC servo motor that delivers unwavering accurate speed with instant acceleration.  

The belt-drive system (with a new belt) absorbs the slightest vibration of the motor, no noise, all you hear is the music.

The straight pipe tonearm comes mounted with a very nice Shure R47-EDT cartridge and NOS Shure ET2 stylus.


Realistic Lab 290
Realistic Lab 290

Realistic Lab 290 

(1980) $200


This Realistic Lab 290 is in very nice, near perfect condition.

Another of the many excellent turntables made in Japan for Radio Shack by CEC, it personifies the vintage look and it's a gorgeous piece.

Like the other late 70's turntables from Radio Shack, the Lab 290 is also lesser known as its more popular Lab cousins (like the Lab 400 & 440), but the Lab 290 is a rock-solid, two-speed, belt-drive, semi-automatic deck with a faithful DC servo motor that delivers unwavering accurate speed with instant acceleration.  

The belt-drive system (with a new belt) absorbs the slightest vibration of the motor, no noise, all you hear is the music.

The straight pipe tonearm comes mounted with a very nice Shure R47-EDT cartridge and Shure 5X stylus.

The original dust cover and walnut veneer plinth are also flawless.

Realistic Lab 270
Realistic Lab 270

Realistic Lab 270 

(1980) $200


Rediscovered and packed away properly in its original box (after being in storage for over 20 years), this Realistic Lab 270 is absolutely like new!

One of the many excellent turntables made in Japan for Radio Shack by CEC, it personifies the vintage look and it's a gorgeous piece.

Lesser known as its more popular Lab cousins (like the Lab 400 & 440), the Lab 270 is a rock-solid, two-speed, belt-drive, semi-automatic deck with a powerful DC servo motor.

It delivers unwavering accurate speed with instant acceleration.  

The belt-drive system (with a new belt) absorbs the slightest vibration of the motor, no noise, all you hear is the music.

The traditional S-shaped tonearm has fresh oil that raises and the lowers the arm with smooth, damped cueing.

The original dust cover and walnut veneer plinth with its very nice white silkscreen lettering are also flawless.


About Realistic, Optimus (Radio Shack, Tandy Corp)...
Realistic branded vintage stereo gear is all over the place.  Some of it is right up there in quality with the best of Pioneer, Sansui, etc.  Also, some of it is just...ok.   Their best era was during the 70's when they successfully competed head-to-head with all the big names in high fidelity.  They sourced practically all their products from Japan and sometimes had the exact same components inside their gear as the competition but at a much lower price.  


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