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Stereo Turntables 

AR XA

(mid-to-late 60's) $350

A classic piece of vintage history, this very nice, fully operational, Acoustic Research Model XA turntable is nesting in a custom "clamshell" style cabinet with a tinted "perplex" dust-cover.  This is one of the later early models that has two motors instead of a single one. The second motor was used to "coax" the first motor's direction.  

This is a fully manual turntable; you must gently place the tone arm on the record to start listening and lift it at the end. There is no cueing device. 

It was completely disassembled and all moving parts were cleaned and lubed. It has two new belts and the speed is dead-on accurate. The plinth was re-oiled prior to placement in the larger case; the deck retains its original smooth, vibration-damping finish.  

The original tonearm also has the original headshell fitted with a very nice, classic Empire 808 cartridge and new stylus...properly aligned.  

Included is a copy of the original owner's manual, brochure and related paperwork.


About AR turntables...

The first turntables were shipped to dealers in 1961. They were a completely assembled package except for the pickup cartridge: the drive/platter system mounted on a finished wooden base, tonearm, power and amplifier cables, turntable mat, overhang plate, stylus force gauge transparent dust cover. The initial price was $58, on which the company lost money. It was sub-sequentially raised in steps, in 1972 it was still only $90.

The turntable quickly gained profitability, and AR sold hundreds of thousands of them. Although it was the least expensive quality turntable on the market, many reviewers and consumer organizations rated it the best-with one exception. Stereophile thought it was good, but said that the spindle was too big. In fact that was an incorrect call; the spindle diameter was precisely what industry standard specified.


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Technics SL-23
Technics SL-23

Technics SL-23

 (1976) SOLD

In absolutely pristine cosmetic and working condition, this SL-23 was one of Technics' "affordable" model in the 1976 line up.  With its walnut accents, it really does look great.

It has a static balanced, S-shaped tone arm that comes with the original Technics headshell.  Mounted on the headshell is a brand new Ortofon Omega cartridge & stylus.   This semi-automatic turntable also has a built in strobe so that the speed accuracy can be seen and easily adjusted. It also has a vernier adjustment of both 33 and 45 rpm speeds...a very nice touch

Basically, the Technics SL-23 is a high quality, belt-driven, two-speed turntable with a FG (frequency generator) servo-controlled DC motor with IC drive. It took your basic belt-drive concept and added Japanese engineering to take the quality and refinement to the next level. 

The SL-23 features low wow & flutter, rumble and power consumption.  This eliminates the need for cartridge alignment in two of the three axis and simplifies the ownership experience.  

Sanyo TP-600SA
Sanyo TP-600SA

Sanyo TP-600SA

 (1977)  $250

shipping not available

Here's another rare beauty, made in Japan by CEC for Sanyo. The TP-600SA is a high-performance, semi-automatic (auto-return and shutoff), stereo turntable that was well designed and engineered to last.  Even some 40 years later, it works perfectly and looks beautiful.

The specs and build quality for this elegant 2-speed, belt-drive turntable are very, very good.  The design of the 600SA is a departure from the usual, basic styling of most vintage decks out there. The simple controls along with the twin chrome counterweights and anti-skate pendulum all combine to set this apart. The static balanced S-shaped tonearm comes mounted with a very nice Empire 8000/XVE &XVE stylus.

Fairly heavy at 16 lbs, the vintage look is because of its real walnut timber veneer plinth that sits on top of a secondary lower base.  Basically the entire unit is in good condition and the original dust cover has no cracks.Like we said earlier...pretty rare, not usually seen for sale (especially in this good condition) because they're keepers.  It is certainly one of the better Sanyo turntables ever made. 


About Sanyo...

Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd. was a Japanese major electronics company and formerly a member of the Fortune Global 500.  They were one of the few electronics companies (like Hitachi) that made most of their own high fidelity components in-house using their own parts.  They also supplied some of the other big names like Pioneer, Sansui, etc. with Sanyo built parts and components. Their late 70's JCX  and PLUS series of receivers are very well known and in high demand by audiophiles.  At one point in their history, they had over 230 subsidiaries and affiliates.  Sanyo was eventually bought by Panasonic in 2009. 

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Concept 2QD
Concept 2QD

Concept 2QD

(1980)  Not for sale at this time

Released in a very limited production run in 1980, there are only about eight or nine of these vintage Concept 2QD turntables known to have been resold worldwide in the last 10 years!  

Of all the true audiophile gear released under the Concept Audio brand, they only designed and sold one turntable model ...the Concept 2QD.  Depending on your knowledge and/or your desire to obtain rare high quality vintage equipment, the 2QD may be on your radar.  To those who have followed Cherry Vintage Audio over the years, it's no secret that we lust after Concept gear.  Currently, it is not for sale...

The Concept 2QD is a heavy (yet super quiet), two-speed, quartz locked, direct-drive, fully automatic turntable.  It was the result of a concerted effort to design a turntable that offered both ultimate precision and ultimate convenience.  From the trademark Concept rosewood veneer plinth to the soft brushed aluminum control panel, it is just flat-out gorgeous.

The 2QD has two motors; the platter motor is a 90 pole brushless DC servo design that is controlled via quartz crystal reference phase-locked loop servo system.  The 3.5 lb platter has a start-up time of 1.8 seconds.  A second induction motor handles the automatic tonearm functions.  The straight pipe tonearm itself is made of ultra low mass aircraft quality aluminum that results in minimal inertia and resonance.  The 2DQ uses a strictly proprietary headshell.

There are many more features but instead of listing them all here, there is an available (online) full-color Concept 2QD brochure and copies of the original owner's manual.

Every detail, from the action of the controls to the damping material of the feet had been carefully thought out and crafted by a distinguished team of designers and production engineers in Japan.  The assembled team of these Japanese engineers was part of Pacific Stereo's long history in cultivating relationships required to build the Concept components.

The final result was a remarkable record playing instrument - a turntable designed to satisfy even the most discerning audiophile.


About Concept...

Recognized universally as some of the very best stereo equipment ever made, the Concept receivers and turntable circuitry was designed in-house, by Dick Schram, at Pacific Stereo (late 70's California). Tom Ishimoto, former product development manager of Marantz, also had a hand in building some of the Concept line at NEC of Japan. The bulk of the manufacturing was done by TCE, an electronics manufacturing division of Tandy Corp. (Tandy was the parent company of U.S. electronics retail chain Radio Shack). A lot of effort was made in upgrading the Concept design capabilities, and TCE's production techniques at the time were described as "terrific". Several other manufacturers were considered for the Concept receivers, but, as far as Schram was concerned, TCE was by far the best. They had gifted engineers who were excited to work on some REAL hi-fidelity audio products and became very loyal to him during the entire process. The Concept credo was "better quality parts, operated with more margin of safety, superior circuits and no shortcuts" - that's why they last so long and still sound as good today.

More about Pacific Stereo (and Concept...)

The Concept line of stereo receivers, speakers, etc were offered by Pacific Stereo as their top tier house brands. (in order, top to bottom: Concept, Reference by Quadraflex, Quadraflex and TransAudio) The top of the line receiver was the Concept 16.5 (165 watts per channel, considered by many to be the best stereo receiver ever made!).  Basically, when a customer went into a Pacific Stereo store looking for Pioneer, Sansui, Kenwood, etc, the salesman would steer them toward one of the "house" brands, the best of which were the Concepts.  Normally you might think that the house brand would be some cheaply made unit designed for maximum profit to the retailer. But, in this case, the Concepts (and secondarily, the Reference series) were very well built and high performing receivers.  Of course, there was the very special Concept 2QD turntable that was the only one good enough to carry the Concept name.   And then there was the Reference 650FETR which was Richard Schram's baby all the way, a very fine stereo receiver that deserves to be in any serious audiophile's collection.

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MCS (Technics) 2500
MCS (Technics) 2500

Technics / MCS  2500

 (1978)  $200

In pristine cosmetic and working condition, this is a cool black beauty.  The MCS 2500 is essentially a "hybrid" that's situated somewhere between the Technics SL-20 and SL-23 models.  Same motor and belt size as the SL-20/23 but branded "MCS".  Interestingly, this early MCS 2500 was called Matched Component Systems rather then the later Modular Component Systems.  Strictly a marketing decision.  

The 2500 is a semi-automatic deck for convenient tonearm return and shut-off exactly like the SL-23.  Also, it is in a nice black color scheme with gold accents and looks more classy than the usual silver this era of Technics sports. 

And, like the early Technics, this series of MCS turntables came with the S-type tonearm and universal SME cartridge head shell which allows much more in the way of cartridge choices and upgrading, unlike the later Technics P-mount straight tonearms.  Included is a brand new Ortofon Omega cartridge and stylus.

Another difference between the Technics versions and the MCS 2500 is the laminated black MDF plinth on the 2500 is far better than the plastic variants used on the Technics models...much better damping and less acoustic rumble.  This one comes with the beautiful original, crystal clear dust cover.

MCS 6502
MCS 6502

MCS 6502

(1978)  $200

In like new cosmetic and working condition, this MCS 6502 turntable was, as is fairly common knowledge these days, originally sold by JC Penney. They contracted with various suppliers to build the "MCS" branded turntables.  They were mostly built by Matsushida (Technics) and CEC of Japan.  The 6502 was most definitely built by Technics.

Surprisingly (or not), the 6502 is one fine turntable.  The beautiful  rosewood veneer plinth catches the eye immediately.  This is a 2-speed, semi-automatic, belt drive unit with cueing, strobe, anti-skate and very attractive, well designed controls on the top deck.  This one has a new belt and the speed is absolutely spot on.

The S shaped tonearm is of very good quality and the motor is steady and reliable.  In summary, it's great looking, easy to use and the original dust cover is pristine.


About MCS (Modular Component Systems)...
MCS was the house brand for JC Penney back in the 70's and was often passed over by audiophiles simply because it was sold by Penney's.  However, in our opinion, whoever worked for JC Penney's electronics acquisition department at the time certainly had discerning taste which resulted in some very good products being offered. There is some debate over who actually manufactured the MCS series for JC Penney. Most seem to agree that it was either NEC while others mention Technics. 
Probably the different models in the MCS line were made by different manufacturers, all of whom designed great products for Penney's.  By the late 70's, it was near the end of the receiver power wars and despite the fact that most of the mid to high range MCS units had actually incorporated some of the latest technology at the time, digital was looming on the horizon and was about to change the face of HiFi.


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BIC 940
BIC 940

BIC 940

(1975) $185 (automatic stacking unit)

Completely restored and in excellent cosmetic and working condition, this BIC 940 was an engineering design effort directed towards the development of a unique 2-speed, record stacking turntable equipped with fully automatic, multiple record playing capability.

It's drive system utilizes a slow speed 24 pole synchronous motor, and belt drive, previously found only in fine manual turntables.  This results in significantly reduced rumble, wow and flutter since idler-pulleys are totally eliminated.

The model 940 maintains precise speed over a wide range of power line voltages, since its motor's rotational rate is determined solely by power line frequency (60Hz in North America)

The tonearm system features minimal friction bearings, low mass and resonance, stylus force, and tonearm balancing and an isolated counterweight to maintain optimal tracking force from the first to last record played.  This comes mounted with a brand new AT C-15 cartridge and stylus.

Another good feature, a pivoting cartridge shell, permits easy cartridge installation.

Specs:

Drive method: belt

Motor: 24-pole, 300rpm, AC synchronous

Speeds: 33 and 45rpm

Record size: 7 or 12"

Maximum number of records: 4

Cartridge: new AT CN-15 or standard 1/2" mount

Cable capacitance: less than 125pF for CD4 compatibility


About BIC...(NOT the "flick your Bic" lighters)...

Since 1973, BIC America (not to be confused with the company that said "flick your bic" lighters) is known to many for patenting their famous "Venturi Port") has offered a wide range of high quality components and speaker systems for the consumer electronics industry. Over the years, their audio components have consistently earned rave reviews from trusted publications and numerous “Best Buy” ratings from the leading consumer testing magazine.  Still in business today, the BIC product line offers models ranging from in-wall speakers to tower speakers and these products have become recognized in the audio industry in the category of high performance speakers. 


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