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Stereo Turntables (Page 2)

Kenwood KD-3070
Kenwood KD-3070

Kenwood KD-3070 

 (1977)  $265


Simply beautiful, sleek and of excellent design, the Kenwood KD-3070 is a very nice, direct-drive, semi-automatic turntable that was carefully built to hit squarely at the main obstacles to perfect record reproduction.

It incorporates a major advancement in direct drive technology. The 20 pole, 30 slot servo controlled DC motor with high torque for rotational stability, coupled with high inertia produced by a heavier platter, increase performance to bring the level of wow and flutter down to 0.035% wrms, and holding rumble to -70dB.  The topside strobe and speed controls ensure accurate control in maintaining the exact speed in 33 & 45 rpm.  Silky smooth and gentle cueing is another feature on the KD-3070.

In 1977, the newly redesigned tonearm was a further achievement in quality sound reproduction. It obtains low tracking error and low resonance by reducing the effects of unbalanced rotational forces to the minimum.  A brand new Ortofon cartridge and stylus are included on this really nice turntable.

Low resonance is also a feature of the carefully constructed base and understates the simple elegance with the dark slate gray surface. And the semi-automatic function provides the ease and convenience of use while maintaining maximum quality performance.

Kenwood KD-3055
Kenwood KD-3055

Kenwood KD-3055

 ('76-'77)  SOLD

In a 1977 advertisement, Kenwood demonstrated the KD-3055 in a dramatic fashion by placing it directly on top of a large floor speaker.  It eventually picked up its nickname: "The Rock".


With its special base made of an anti-resonance *"concrete" so dense that it absorbs vibrations from the speakers and the floor before they got to the specially designed "S" shaped tonearm.​ Nothing happened.  No howl.  No screech.  Just music, loud and clear.

This heavyweight beauty is a fully automatic, belt drive with some very cool chrome compliments and controls (lever handles for record size selection and cueing, chrome buttons for 33/45 and start/cut and repeat)

The tonearm comes mounted with a gently used, very nice Audio Technica AT-130E cartridge and stylus
The operating and cosmetic condition is excellent and the original dust cover is included.


The term "concrete" is a marketing hook from Kenwood.  The actual material was called ARCB (Anti Resonance Compression Base) that was a composite of powdered synthetic marble (like Corian) mixed with resin and then cast it into shape.  Another company called Optonica used the same basic formula for their very cool RP-3636MKii turntable.

Kenwood KD-2070
Kenwood KD-2070

Kenwood KD-2070

 (1978) SOLD

(*chrome clamp & chrome feet available at extra charge)

This Kenwood KD-2070 is a direct-drive, manually operated turntable that used a vastly improved (during the late 70's), 20-pole brushless DC motor which is coupled directly to a heavier turntable platter. Basically, what this gives you is a high moment of inertia which provides smoother, quieter rotational speed.
The tonearm design used in the KD-2070 is as fully impressive as the turntable and drive system. The high precision statically balanced tonearm used in the KD-2070 is so perfectly balanced that it set a new high in tonearm performance in 1978.  It comes mounted with a brand new Ortofon cartridge and stylus.

Undesirable "shimmy" and torsional types of resonance can deteriorate reproduced sound quality during record reproduction. These problems, inherent even in some of the best designed tonearms, were eliminated in the KD-2070 tonearm.

A no-frills, yet excellent deck, the base is a medium dark grey made of dense resin concrete that virtually eliminates acoustic feedback. 

The other features are an onboard strobe, a single chrome "T" type shifter for on/cue/stop control and the original chrome anti-skate "dongle".  

This also has a brand new, crystal clear, acrylic dust cover.

The KD-2070 makes for an easy, trouble free, reliable, well-built deck that gives you excellent performance.  

*Note: The listed price does not include the chrome record clamp or custom chrome feet, those are available at extra charge.


About Kenwood (Trio)...

Established in 1946 as the Kasuga Radio Co. Ltd. in Komagane City, Japan, in 1960 the company was renamed Trio Corporation. In 1963 the first overseas office was founded in Los Angeles.

In the early 1960s, Trio's products were rebranded by the Lafayette Radio Co with a focus on CB radio.

An importer of Japanese-made electronics Radio Shack (Realistic, Tandy Corp) was A&A Trading Co., and a bilingual Japanese-speaking manager from there established a company that would be the exclusive importer of Trio products.

The name Kenwood was invented by Kasuga as being the combination of "Ken", a name common to Japan and North America that had been tested and proven acceptable to American consumers in the name of Kenmore appliance (Sears) \, and "Wood", referring to the durable substance as well as suggesting a relation to Hollywood.  The brand recognition of Kenwood eventually surpassed that of Trio's, and in 1986 Trio bought Kenwood and renamed itself Kenwood.  Eventually, Kenwood merged with JVC in 2008 as JVC/Kenwood.


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Toshiba SR-255
Toshiba SR-255

Toshiba SR-255 

(1978)  $200


In pristine cosmetic and working condition, this beautiful Toshiba SR-255 is a manually operated turntable that employs a direct drive system. Unlike conventional types of record players using a drive belt or an idling wheel for driving the turntable platter, the SR-255 is so designed that the turntable platter is driven directly by the motor (the turntable platter is directly coupled with the motor shaft), thus assuring everlasting performance and longer life.


The DC servo motor is completely free from the effect of variations in power supply frequency thus, providing smooth and stable rotation of the turntable platter.


Changeover of the turntable platter speed is accomplished by an electronic push button system. Either 33-1/3 or 45 rpm can be adjusted precisely by the stroboscope and the appropriate speed control knob.


The static balanced S-shaped tonearm features exceptional sensitivity in both horizontal and vertical directions. It permits the cartridge to offer the ultimate in performance. It is easily raised and lowered by the cueing control lever to protect your records or stylus from damage.

An anti-skating device responsible to the stylus pressure provides stable tracking of the record groove.

The plinth design incorporated a newly developed acoustic material that proved to be very effective in minimizing howling and in resonance and vibration prevention.

The precision made turntable platter with its wide diameter maintains correct operation.

The universal headshell allows you to choose a variety of cartridges even though we always include either a new one or gently used.

The unique insulators attached to the four bottom corners of the cabinet prevent vibrations from external source and howling. They are also effective in minimizing shocks during operation.


About Toshiba...*(and Aurex)
Back in the day, some Toshiba, Sanyo, Hitachi (and other lesser known names) were associated with clock radios, and similar little devices that showed up in various stores that normally didn't sell HiFi gear.
For the dealer, Toshiba was aggressively priced so that there was better margin in their products, which translated to higher profits. This was because Toshiba didn't advertise or get product reviews from the audio magazines. Today, this explains why Toshiba is less known in general about the very good quality in their stereo equipment.

Today, when it comes to vintage HiFi, most recognize the name Toshiba primarily because of its monster class SA-7150 with its massive power at 150 watts per channel.  But, back in the early 70s, when HiFi dealers took on the Toshiba audio product lines, the salesmen considered them a second-level product line to the Marantz, Pioneer, Sony , etc. As time went on, more and more techs and curious salesmen began to open them up, check the build quality.  Guess what? Wow!  Great stuff!  *

The Aurex branded gear was designed as a premium addition to the standard Toshiba line-up.
In fact, even though Toshiba branded products were quite good and performed as good as the big-name gear and still does today, the Aurex was a nothch higher in quality.  Because of their low key marketing stance, it's doubtful their sales volumes were anywhere near those of Sony, Pioneer, etc.


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Sanyo TP-1012A
Sanyo TP-1012A

Sanyo TP-1012A

 (1978)  $175


Released by Sanyo in the late 70's the TP-1012A turntable was designed as part of their mid-tier models.

This is a direct-drive, semi-automatic deck with strobe and speed controls for both 33 & 45 RPM.

Nothing fancy here but it's a solid performer with reliable DC motor and a static baanced S-shaped tonearm.


About Sanyo...

Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd. was a Japanese major electronics company and formerly a member of the Fortune Global 500.  They were one of the few electronics companies (like Hitachi) that made most of their own high fidelity components in-house using their own parts.  They also supplied some of the other big names like Pioneer, Sansui, etc. with Sanyo built parts and components. Their late 70's JCX  and PLUS series of receivers are very well known and in high demand by audiophiles.  At one point in their history, they had over 230 subsidiaries and affiliates.  Sanyo was eventually bought by Panasonic in 2009. 

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Yamaha P-220
Yamaha P-220

Yamaha P-220

('84-'87)  $150


The Yamaha P-220 was described as Yamaha's most affordable turntable in the series that included the P-520 & P-320.

Being the least expensive didn't mean it to be "cheap" because it's still one of Yamaha's "Natural Sound" excellent quality turntables.  It was designed specifically to be a straightforward, semi-automatic, belt-drive, two speed deck that performs day in, day out with reliable, steady speed and operation. 

The P-220 features Yamaha's optimum mass, minimum resonance, straight-pipe tonearm with dynamically damped cueing.  The motor yields less than 0.04% wow and flutter, which, in itself, is an excellent spec.

Even the platter mat is designed to reduce vibration with its special compound.  The stepped plinth design also helps to keep the tonearm and the extra wide counterweight in a stable position to further reduce resonance.

The P-220 is in excellent cosmetic and working condition and that includes the original dust cover as well.


About Yamaha...(1972 and later)...

From the CA-1000 that whipped up a whirlwind and brought Yamaha recognition in the audio world, to the AX-2000A that, after groping around with digital technology, managed a comeback to pure analog. The very successful "Natural Sound" marketing in the 70's brought Yamaha into direct competition with Pioneer, Marantz and almost all the other great companies of the era.


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